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By 2030 our average carbon footprint should be significantly lower to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees. We need to reimagine our Everyday lives, governance, businesses, work – every aspect of our lives to match the earth’s carrying capacity.

Futures Frequency is a 3 hour workshop developed by Sitra . It challenges our assumptions about the future, leads us to imagine preferred Futures and build actions towards it. We will come together to practice Futures thinking and challenge ourselves to see the possibilities for change making. The maximum amount of participants is 20. We will use Zoom and Miro in the workshop. 

Futures Frequency is a workshop method in progress and at the Untitled Festival we test its Prototype to help develop it. We welcome you to this pilot workshop that aims at using the workshop method as a tool to popularize Futures thinking and strengthen the link between Futures thinking and change making. The workshop will be targeted to people and organizations who are interested in these topics, but does not necessarily have any previous experience about them. The workshop is structured around three themes 1) Challenge existing assumptions about the future, 2) Imagine a preferred future, 3) Take action and shape the future. 

Our aim is to use the workshop method as a tool to popularize Futures thinking and strengthen the link between Futures thinking and change making. If we are going to succeed in the transition to a fair and ecologically sustainable society, we need more people to have agency and ownership and to feel that they can have an impact towards the future and to have skills to do that.

We would like to find partners who would be interested in developing the Futures Frequency method further with Sitra. Also, we will make thematic versions of the workshop, meaning Futures Frequency about climate, democracy, data etc, and would love to find partners who work with a specific theme and would be interested in developing these thematic versions with us.

Sitra is an active fund for the future who studies, researches and brings together partners from different sectors in open-minded Trials and reforms. Its future-oriented works are aimed at making Finland succeed as a pioneer of sustainable wellbeing. This session will be Hosted by Jenna Lähdemäki-Pekkinen and Liisa Poussa. Jenna works as a social foresight specialist in Sitra’s Foresight and insight team and Liisa works in Sitra’s Foresight team, producing long-term foresight data in anticipation of the future.

Twitter handle: @SitraFund ,@jennalahdemaki_,@Lillinen
Website: www.sitra.fi/en 

Related Untitled Themes:  Reimagining Human, Reimagining Climate, Reimagining Economy, Reimagining Work, Reimagining the Contract, Reimagining Cities

What is rewarding work? It is something we think work should be for everyone: that the work each and every one of us does feels rewarding, but just as importantly we don’t forget to reward the work of others.

For us, the concept of Rewarding Work embodies the collective future. A future where we care for ourselves but also for each other. It is through the concept of Rewarding Work that we want to take an open-minded look at the future of work life, society and the role of trade unions in them.

In this session participants are asked to open their minds and step into the shoes of others. We work together in order to form a vision of collective future where Rewarding Work – in all it’s many shapes and forms – is something that belongs to us all.  

Service Union PAM wants to be a strong, relevant, modern union for years to come. We realize that we need to throw many balls into the air and Rethink, redo and maybe even restart our union movement. We want to listen to the views of a wide array of people on the role of the Union in shaping the future of work and society. What concrete steps should we take? How would you define a Union if the movement was created today?

PAM logoWith its 220,000 members Service Union PAM is the biggest trade union in Finland. We represent people employed in the private service sector. So next time in Finland you visit a store, a restaurant or see your office Cleaner, say hi! They are now likely to be a member of PAM. Check out this video for more about PAM’s work.

Twitter handle (s): @pamliitto  @mlaakkonen @AVeirto
Website: pam.fi

Related Untitled Agenda Themes : Reimagining the Contract, Reimagining Economy

 

Image: PAM, pam.fi

In today’s business world, ethics are often overlooked for the sake of profit. Charles Armstrong’s mission is to reverse this trend.

Charles Armstrong, @car0lus
Founder of The Trampery, UK, thetrampery.com

 

What could be reimagined in the business world? 

Charles is interested in reimagining the core assumptions of capitalism, in order to find a new role for business in society. His interest towards this topic comes from the lack of discourses about ethics in the entrepreneurial world, an issue that has to be addressed to think about capitalism of the future; in fact, he calls for an urgent shift from a focus on profit towards the team’s well being in a company. He says he is “amazed” by the lack of attention on this issue from his peer entrepreneurs.

How do you think Untitled can help you with your vision? 

Charles wonders whether leaders of conventional businesses are open and prone to rethink the foundations of their activities to the same extent he is trying to do. He is already aware of the presence of the so called “social enterprises” in the UK that are trying to pursue his goal, but realizes their impact is currently very limited since they represent only a fragment of the current global entrepreneurial landscape. 

Who should join the Alliance to help you achieve this goal?

 Charles is willing to meet visionary people as him to build meaningful conversations on the topic, since such a community does not exist yet.

 

Images: Charles Armstrong, creativeconomy.britishcouncil.org

How can we rethink our economy in terms of more inclusivity?

Alexa Clay, @alexaclay
R
esearcher, writer and public speaker. Director of RSA US,
A global community of proactive problem solvers building networks and opportunities for people to collaborate, influence and demonstrate practical solutions to realise change, thersa.org

 

What can be reimagined in today’s economy? 

Alexa believes that the moment we are currently living in requires us to rethink justice in our economic system, finding a way that to offer people opportunities to experience a social and economic mobility.

How would you develop this vision?

Her project requires us to create coalitions around cities, and this can only be done by allowing different social groups that normally do not interact to coonfront one another.

Who needs to join the Alliance to make your vision true?

People from different backgrounds should join the alliance (from grassroot societies, artists or historians). Alexa believes that the right people to help her to make her vision true are generous people, individuals with a natural instinct towards collaboration and with “fire in their bellies” in terms of what is wrong and needs to change.

 

Image: Alexa Clay, thersa.org

Nadia EL-Imam of Edgeryders thinks that part of the issue of institutions not being able to navigate the turmoils, like pandemic and climate crisis, is the excessive reliance on small groups of experts to solve messy interconnected problems. 

Nadia EL-Imam @edgeryders
Co-founder of Edgeryders
Resilience.edgeryders.eu

Why are you participating in Untitled?

My own motivation for getting involved in this initiative is having seen how quickly things fall apart during times of war, even in affluent, seemingly stable societies. Going from buying our groceries in a posh shop the one day to standing in bread lines the next because supply chains were cut off.

It happens so very quickly and the true costs of the damage plays out on so many different levels.

There are signs this understanding has started to “land” as a consequence of the ongoing pandemic.

During the first phases, institutions and companies all over the world were taken by surprise, unable to quickly adapt to the new reality. This does not bode well for our ability to navigate the turmoil that is sure to accompany climate crisis, ecosystems stress, geopolitical hostilities. Why?

I believe part of the issue is an excessive reliance on small groups of experts to solve messy interconnected problems – which is like expecting a neuron trying to fix things that exist at the level of the brain. Another is an impulse to behave as though the world around us can be tamed to obediently fit into neat boxes and processes of our design. And where it does not, attempt to make it so. When the models break, we are at a loss for how to move through the world in new ways.

My own family managed to weather the storm in no small part because we were embedded in a huge network of diasporas that spanned the globe. They are highly diverse in the sense that they deploy a broad range of approaches to meeting material, social and existential needs.

This is something I could contribute to the gathering and what comes after.

What could be reimagined now?

The community and organisation I helped build, Edgeryders, is working to extend the space of economic models that are conceivable and deployable to build a successful, fair civilisation, while preserving the planet’s ecological balance. Inspired by science fiction, we nurture and support new, radical ways to think about the economy and economic policy.

Conceivable: We are using techniques from modelling, speculative fiction, economic history, anthropology and design to broaden the space of “conceivable economies.”

Deployable: There’s already a “mutant population” of economic agents that operate in the current economy, while aspiring to a more long-termism one. Edgeryders has been learning from these agents, in order to come up with policies to thrive and grow further.

See Edgeryders on video.

Photos: Nadia EL-Imam