Artikkelit

The movement for a guaranteed income offers a way to reimagine work, deservedness and dignity. What would the world look like after an income floor? Let’s compare notes on the movement for a guaranteed Income in different countries, and look for signals together of what a world after guaranteed income would look like. A network of academics, activists, artists and culture Creators are needed to make a guaranteed income a reality.

Natalie Foster is one of the leaders in the guaranteed income movement in the United States, and her team at the Economic Security Project has been working hard to make sure a COVID19 guaranteed income is part of the US response to the economic and health crisis.

Natalie is the co-chair and co-founder of the Economic Security Project – a network to support exploration and experimentation of a guaranteed income and reining in the unprecedented concentration of corporate power, and a senior fellow at The Aspen Institute Future of Work Initiative. In 2013, Natalie was founding CEO of Peers.org to support people who work in the gig economy. Prior, she was the CEO and co-founder of Rebuild the Dream, a platform for people-driven economic change, with Van Jones. Previously, Natalie served as digital director for President Obama’s Organizing for America (OFA) and the Democratic National Committee. Natalie built the first digital department at the Sierra Club and served as the Deputy organizing director for MoveOn.org.She’s been awarded Fellowships at the Institute for the Future, Rockwood Leadership Institute and New America California, and is a board member of the California Budget and Policy Center, the Change.org global foundation, and Liberation in a Generation, a project to close the racial wealth gap. Bio Source – Economic Security Project

Website: https://www.economicsecurityproject.org/

Photo: Natalie Foster (c)

Blockchain technologies are claimed to make it possible to develop and implement social technologies that can replace existing social apparatuses of public governance. This could mean for example implementing autonomous executing administration in public governance or building a governance system based on direct democracy – or conversely, distributed autonomous organizations outside public power taking over similar tasks. 

In this conversation we explore a future where by scaling different distributed ledger technology solutions  replace current public organisations and processes.  What kind of impact would it have on democracy, public services and on our societies at large?  Would this be a desirable direction to develop our public administration? Can technological solutions be a substitute for institutional trust? 

Launched in January 2020, TOKEN (Transformative Impact Of Blockchain Technologies in Public Services) is an EU funded project whose ultimate goal is to develop an experimental ecosystem to enable the adoption of Distributed Ledger Technology and to prove its value, via highly replicable Use Cases, as a driver for the transformation of public services. TOKEN has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Grant Agreement No. 825268. 

Twitter handle(s): @TOKEN_EU

Website: https://token-project.eu/

How we think about the future determines how we act today. For a long time, the prevailing belief has been that we are living in the age of TINA – T here I s N o A lternative. However, the rise of populism, Fridays for the Future and, more recently, the coronavirus crisis, are only the most recent developments to demonstrate that a vivid competition about alternative Futures has begun.

In this conversation, we will reflect upon different conceptions of the future – from progressivism to collapsology – and think about why and how we should include future generations in today’s policy making.

The conversation will be Hosted by Paulina Fröhlich, Head of the Program “Future of Democracy” at Progressives Zentrum, and Paul Jürgensen, Project Manager at Progressives Zentrum. Das Progressives Zentrum is a Berlin-based, non-profit think tank devoted to promoting effective policies for social progress.

Twitter: @PaulinaFrohlich , @pauljuergensen , @DPZ_Berlin

Website: progressives-zentrum.org

Fit for purpose tools for a government of the 20th century do not provide the solutions we need today. Public governance must increase their capabilities to not only strengthen trust and legitimacy, but deliver on tackling the Wicked problems of today. Can distributed Ledger technologies such as blockchain offer more than just the hype and be a part of the solution?

 In the workshop we will co-create and explore together desirable Futures of the use of distributed Ledger technology in the public sector. We start off from four concrete use cases being developed within the TOKEN project and use them as catapults for collective Imagination of a world where technology builds trust, transparency and legitimacy. 

The four use cases:

1) Public funding distribution in the EU 

2) Incorporating blockchain into active Smart Cities projects in Central Macedonia: Municipality of Katerini 

3) Re-Imaging urban logistics: Assessing the specific value of distributed Ledger technologies, DLTs for urban mobility 

4) Re-Imaging data valorisation services: Improving citizens’ lives whilst also increasing urban services efficiency and Exploring new economic models based on data valorization.

Launched in January 2020, TOKEN (Transformative Impact Of BlocKchain technologies in Public Services) is an EU funded project whose ultimate goal is to develop an experimental Ecosystem to enable the adoption of Distributed Ledger Technology and to test its value, via highly replicable Use Cases, as a driver for the Transformation of public services. TOKEN has received funding from the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under the Grant Agreement No. 825268

Twitter handle (s): https://twitter.com/TOKEN_EU

Website: https://token-project.eu/

George Zisiadis and Adam Cronkright are the co-coordinators at of by for  and their mission is to get beyond parties and politicians, putting everyday people in front and center. In this discussion, George and Adam will share more about their new vision to replace partisan elections with democratic lotteries. This is a vision now you haven’t heard of yet. But it’s rooted in ancient Athenian democracy, and is re-emerging in the Lottery-drawn Citizens’ Assemblies that are shaping politics around the world.
Participants are invited to partake in small group discussions in breakout rooms, to ask questions, and to share both what excites them and what they’d like to know more about regarding democratic lotteries.
Adam Cronkright is on the Coordinating Committee for Democracy R&D, a network of close to 40 organizations advancing democratic Lotteries in 18 countries around the world.
Before dedicating himself to of by for , Adam co-founded Democracy In Practice , whose work reinventing student government with democratic Lotteries was a finalist for the Council of Europe 2016 Democracy Innovation Award. Democracy in Practice’s work was recently featured on Malcolm Gladwell’s Revisionist History podcast. Adam was Deeply involved in the Occupy Wall Street protests in Manhattan, and Deeply immersed in the peaceful grassroots’ Uprising that toppled an unpopular government in Bolivia in 2019.
George Zisiadis is an artist and designer who leads large, complex projects that speak to People’s hearts. His site-specific public artwork, utilizing the latest technologies, has reimagined San Francisco’s most iconic public spaces – including the Civic Center and Grace Cathedral – and consistently moved people of all ages and backgrounds. His work has been featured in TIME, NPR, WIRED, FastCompany, and more. Two years ago he set aside his art practice to dedicate himself to the study of social movements from past to present

Twitter: @adamcronkright
Website: joinofbyfor.us

Related Untitled Agenda Themes : Reimagining power, Reimagining the contract

Photos: Adam Cronkright and George Zisiadis, joinofbyfor.us (c)

We have to reimagine the democratic process by breaking out of the traditional governmental pattern of “decide, do, defend”. In an age of personalization, people feel left behind by government – decisions are remote and inflexible, and they cannot easily make real changes in their communities and societies. How can we develop a more participatory, conversational, Collaborative and inclusive way of democracy, where participation opportunities are paired with the skills for effective participation, and voices from every community are heard?

Is it possible to break up the concept of democracy as an every-five-year process and bring it directly to People’s daily lives? How can we engage in frequent democratic participation beyond the traditional spaces of government? How can we root social conversations into governance systems? Where could democracy be, on a positive timeline, after 10 years? What changes would be needed? How would decisions be different?

The conversation on Day 1 tackle the long-term vision in preperation for Day 2, where we will think about what the first year of that transformation looks like. What can we do in the present, within a year? What are some practical ways to put down the first brick of the new government model depicted? Decision makers, politicians, policy makers, local organizations, emerging or big corporations, citizens, and really anyone interested in social participation, engagement, democracy and collaboration are all welcome to the sessions.

Anthony Zacharzewski is the founder and president of  The Democratic Society [DemSoc], a non-profit organization focusing on Civic participation and new models of governance. DemSoc works for greater participation and dialogue in democracy. Anthony is interested in supporting governments, parliaments and any organization in the process of decision making. He is also interested in understanding how the sporadic and developing practice of democratic participation can become a stable, sustainable way of working.

Twitter: @demsoc; @anthonyzach

Website:  https://www.demsoc.org/

 

This conversation reimagines models of data ownership: Who has a say on how data is used, collected and made available for others to use? For citizens, companies and NGOs alike, how can we ensure that the data produced by them and about themselves is used in a way that they desire? And what are the consequences of moving away from extractivist data practices, towards an era of data agency?

Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) and the immutability of the transactions they record offer one possible tool to move forwards: models of data ownership and especially the effects of transparency are explored in four experiments run by Token project, where public organisations are implementing DLT-based solutions in their services such as public grant distribution, mobility, smart city services and public procurement. 

Launched in January 2020, TOKEN (Transformative Impact Of BlocKchain tEchnologies iN Public Services) is an EU funded project. Its ultimate goal is to develop an experimental ecosystem enabling the adoption of Distributed Ledger Technology and to prove its value as a driver for the transformation of public services, via highly replicable Use Cases. TOKEN has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Grant Agreement No. 825268. 

Twitter handle: @TOKEN_EU
Website: token-project.eu

Related Untitled Agenda Theme: Reimagining power, Reimagining the contract

 

Image: TOKEN, token-project.eu

The multiple, overlapping crises of 2020 have magnified the deep fractures at the heart of our social and political orders, both within countries and across borders. There are now countless working groups, task forces, and commissions to “build back better” and to reimagine our world anew. But the truth is these efforts are led by those who least understand the pain of injustice and the trauma of broken systems. To reimagine our world, we must center the voices and imaginations of those who have long suffered. This requires those with power to reckon with their privilege, and to understand their complicity in sustaining this broken world. Only by doing that can we help right historical wrongs and realize a future where all can thrive. 

Understanding the fights we should fight and the roles we should play requires understanding the elements that comprise our identity (personal and professional) — and how they are constructed or sustained within structures of oppression. This is deep, personal, searching work, and it’s not easy.

But in this session we will create a safe space to do this together, and will respect wherever you are in the process. So whether you want to actively participate, or just to listen, we welcome you and celebrate your willingness to do this work. 

This conversation is for anyone invested in a future where all humans can lead dignified, joyous lives, and especially recommended for those in positions to shape our world—from the hyperlocal to the transnational levels. We are in a period of righteous reckoning, and the tensions playing out in 2020 will only continue to grow in momentum. Those with privilege must be true allies and accomplices in revolutionary transformation. 

Panthea Lee is the Executive Director of Reboot. She is passionate about driving unlikely collaborations between communities, activists, movements, and institutions to tackle structural inequity—and working with cultural institutions to build momentum for courageous change.

Panthea has led multi-stakeholder processes to tackle social challenges in 30+ countries. Her work has been featured in Al Jazeera, The Atlantic, New York Times, MIT Innovations Journal, Stanford Social Innovation Review. She serves on the boards of Development Gateway and People Powered: The Global Hub for Participatory Democracy. 

 

Twitter handles: @PantheaLee @theReboot
Website: www.reboot.org

Related Untitled Agenda Theme: Reimagining power

 

Photo: Panthea Lee, reboot.org

The concept of innovation is still deeply associated with technological innovation as motor for societal progress, emerging out of a competition of ideas. But is it possible to shift this perspective to social innovation, a process of learning collaboratively how to live better together? How might we involve mainstream stakeholders in the process of turning innovation to a public level in order to build dedicated infrastructures, and make it more accessible by communities?

Björn Müller @bjObj0
Co-founder and manager at STRIDE the unSchool,
an education provider and think tank supporting individuals, organisations and cities to turn social innovation into a transformative process of learning, stride-learning.ch

 

What could be reimagined now?

At the moment, we witness at the same time too much and not enough novelty. On one hand, there’s a whole infrastructure, from incubators to accelerators and competitions, dedicated to bringing innovation at a global level. But on the other hand, the fundamental issues and problems for which the world is suffering are not addressed, therefore we don’t see any concrete and deep change.

For this reason social innovation seems to be an opportunity. Is there a space or infrastructure to do social innovation across different sectors, not confining it to any sector?

How could we experiment with innovation as such?

Everything starts with challenging a very modern way of understanding innovation which is tied to the idea of continuous growth. This is coupled with the belief that a good life is reached by ever-increasing access and range into the world, making life as easy and fast as possible. Conversely, innovation can deal with a much more life-affirming side, based on participatory and collaborative aspects, putting life at the center, for example in our political, economical and social agendas.

How could social innovation be supported and look like in ten years’ time?

We can imagine a world where social innovation could be publicly supported by states and therefore having the chance to launch social experiments and endeavors at a different scale. Mainstream actors could be involved in shifting their orientation or innovation efforts to contribute in building a sustainable and meaningful lifestyle. In doing so, it is also possible to move away from the concept that makes innovation revolve just around technology. Innovation could then reconnect to its Enlightenment roots, turning it into a force of bettering (quality of) life for all.

 

Image: Björn Müller, twitter.com/bjObj0

Social media has reshaped forever the way we communicate and get information. Nevertheless, the actions of the big companies behind them often raise a lot of criticism: what if social media belonged to the people?

 

Elina Iida Sofia Hirvonen @interneiti
Freelance journalist, for example
for Ylioppilaslehti, Helsingin Sanomat and Image.

 

What could be reimagined within the social media world?

Elina criticizes the entrepreneurial side of it, wishing that these platforms could belong to the people and not to companies: the current structure influences how information is spread among the population and does not foster equality. Current social media structures and algorithms are making profit out of people’s most intimate feelings and experiences, and it’s creating conflicts and affecting the media as well. 

How would Untitled help to develop your vision?

Elina sees Untitled as an opportunity to discuss how the ideal social network should be built, debating on which instruments would be necessary to undertake challenges such as ensuring privacy for all the users.

Who needs to join the Alliance to make this envision true?

Involving informatic experts for consultancy would allow to realise the technical side of the idea.

Image: Elina Iida Sofia Hirvonen, @interneiti Instagram